Tag Archives: Discounted Promotion

An Invitation to Readers

Time and money: it can be easy for many to spend too much of one in pursuit of the other, so I thought that I’d do my little bit to ease the pressure on you, at least for a day or two. Don’t get too excited though, as I’m afraid that I am not able to do your housework, or make one of those magical cash transfers into your bank account so oft promised by millionaire gentlemen who contact you via email. No, neither of those. Instead, from today until midnight this Thursday (31st August), you can download a Kindle copy of Anthology: Wry Out West for 99p or 99c, rather than the usual £2.49 or $3.20. Not bad for 211, 273 or 369 pages, however you reckon them (273 in the paperback version). If you’re a Kindle Unlimited subscriber, that may not sound overly appealing, as you’ll be able to download it and read it for free anyway, but if you’re not, there should be something other than the crude offer of a discount to appeal to you.

Having purchased this anthology you may devote your attention to enjoying five twisted tales of the uncanny, four of which possess a pronounced vein of dark humour:

Old Crotchet
Old Crotchet – her manor, her rules. Cross her at your peril. There’s little that will rile a woman more than 300 years of age than the arrival of some flighty young upstart intent upon displacing her. A humorous period mystery with a supernatural twist.

Gwydion’s Dawn
Lust, mushrooms and the quest for immortality: meet Gwydion Turner, an inept, portentous, psychedelic demon raiser; a wannabe Crowley in crushed velvet. A satirical journey into Glastonbury’s occult counterculture.

Agnes of Grimstone Peverell
A pious minster guide encounters a crusty, atheistical theatre critic and his wife. She seems keen not to let them go, but return to London they must – Lionel has a play to review. That, at least, is his intention.

3:05 am
Never has a portable television set been so unsettling, nor Mike Pearce so irritating.

The Cleft Owl
A tale of occult deception in seventeenth-century Devon, featuring the roguish Dr Robert Tooley, the Worshipful Sir William Bastard, and the Reverend Tickle. The names are one of the few things about this piece not invented by the author.

Reviews for the above can be found attached to the freestanding versions of these tales on Amazon. Further reviews welcome. All of these publications, and The Rude Woman of Cerne, are available free to Kindle Unlimited subscribers.